Each year, through our Collaborative Lenten Gift, we reach out as  a community to one particular place of suffering, amid so many in the world. 

This year, we will open our eyes and hearts to the plight of those suffering on the streets of Boston. We will reach out through our support of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), which provides the highest quality health care services possible to some of the most vulnerable members of our community – Boston’s homeless individuals and families of all ages.  Throughout Lent, in the bulletin, via email, on our website and social media, we will share this story with you.

If you missed our Author Night with Dr. James J. O’Connell, author of “Stories from the Shadows: Reflections of a Street Doctor and President of Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program, click the link below to watch the video:

Author Night with Dr. James O’Connell

More detailed information here: Community Read, Author Night, and Book Discussion – “Stories from the Shadows: Reflections of a Street Doctor” by Dr. James J. O’Connell

A Special Collection will be taken up at all Masses on the weekend of April 2-3. 

If you prefer, you may donate online here at any time during the Lenten season, or by sending a check to your parish office (please note 2022 Lenten Gift in the memo.)  Thank you very much.

Our gift will allow each of us to share in easing the suffering
and to answer Lent’s clarion call to love extravagantly.


TELLING THE STORY

The most recent chapter appears first; scroll down for older entries.  Click the chapter title to read the full text.

This Weekend: Special Second Collection for Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program

Each year, through our Collaborative Lenten Gift, we reach out as a community to one particular place of suffering, amid so many in the world. This year, we will open our eyes and hearts to the plight of those suffering on the streets of Boston. We will reach out through our support of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), which provides the highest quality health care services possible to some of the most vulnerable members of our community – Boston’s homeless individuals and families of all ages. A well-known and well regarded organization, they care for an ...
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Telling the Story Part Three: Integrated Care

Those of you who have been reading the Bulletin for the past two weeks have been introduced to the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), the recipient of our Collaborative's 2022 Lenten Gift. As you can imagine, there is no shortage of worthy causes, both domestic and international, from which to choose. Our Service Commission decided that this year we would direct our attention to a local problem: the homeless and the quality of healthcare that they receive. The mission of the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program is to ensure unconditionally equitable and dignified access to ...
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Telling the Story Part Two: Jeremiah, Jackie, and Walter

In last week’s bulletin we learned about the Boston Health Care for the Homeless Program (BHCHP), the recipient of this year’s Collaborative Lenten Gift. We learned of its 37-year history including about its founders, its organization structure, its breadth in illnesses treated, and its mission to serve all aspects of the wellbeing of the homeless in Boston. This week, let’s turn to the individual stories of those who live in the shadows and whom the BHCHP seeks to help and share in God’s grace. There are many paths to homelessness including mental health, discrimination, addiction, and violence. However, many of ...
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Telling the Story Part One: About Boston Health Care for the Homeless Project

The St. John-St. Paul Collaborative Service Commission has chosen the Boston Healthcare for the Homeless Program (BHCHP) as the beneficiary of our 2022 Collaborative Lenten Gift. We would like to tell you a little bit about this inspiring organization. In the United States of America there are almost 600 thousand people estimated to be without a home. In Massachusetts in 2020 the number was estimated at almost 18,000 people. The reasons are multiple – most often poverty combined with another risk factor such as mental illness, illiteracy, substance use, violence, disability. In July 1985, a small group of 7 professionals ...
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